classroom-risk-managementGlobally, over US$5 trillion in infrastructure investment is required to both maintain existing assets as well as to build new infrastructure in transportation, water, energy, telecommunications, and environmental services. National, state, and local governments worldwide all face tremendous budget gaps and therefore are increasingly adopting Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) models as a means to provide critical infrastructure service delivery.


To address the range of issues in identifying, financing, and procurement PPP projects, IP3 provides a suite of classroom and online courses.

 Key training areas include:
  • PPP policy and institutional framework development
  • Project identification, screening and selection
  • Feasibility analyses (technical, economic, tariff, and project financing)
  • Transaction structuring, financing and procurement strategies
  • Transaction bid and tender preparation, tendering/procurement assistance, and negotiation
  • Public awareness and stakeholder consultation
  • Bid evaluation, award, and negotiation
  • Performance monitoring, contract compliance and dispute resolution
  • PPP service delivery and the poor

Sectors include: energy & electricity, water & waste water, transportation (roads, airports, ports, and rail), telecommunications, education, health, and municipal services

 

participates-posingRegulation of infrastructure utilities is a core function of government. Effective regulation provides the appropriate accountability and transparency necessary to ensure consumer interests are protected while simultaneously providing the environment for utilities to earn a fair return on its investment and expand capacity as necessary.


To address the number of issues that go into designing, developing and implementing regulatory functions, IP3 provides a suite of classroom and online courses.




 Key training areas include:
  • Policy, legislative, and legal requirements for effective regulation
  • Designing regulatory institutions and their financial instruments
  • Creating regulatory rules, processes, and procedures
  • Public awareness and customer relations programs
  • Tariff structuring and subsidy analysis design/options
  • Rate case application preparations and strategic reviews
  • Quality of service and expansion
  • Rural service delivery
  • Competition policy and regulatory reform in key sectors


Sectors include: energy & electricity, water & waste water, transportation (roads, airports, ports, and rail), telecommunications, education, health, and municipal services.

 

training-sessionUtilities are constantly under pressure to reduce costs, improve service delivery, and expand capacity.   To do so, requires focused attention on financial, managerial, and technology planning within the utility management team. It also requires skills in communication to an often not-so-friendly media and public-at-large.


To address the challenges of managing a “competitive” utility, IP3 provides a suite of classroom and online courses.

 



Key training areas for utilities include:
  • Restructuring, commercializing, and corporatizing utilities
  • Corporate governance planning and implementation
  • Utility financial management, budgeting and investment planning
  • Customer service and stakeholder communication strategies
  • Employee redeployment and workforce productivity
  • E-government and IT solutions to expand and improve services
  • Mergers and acquisition planning


Sectors include: energy & electricity, water & waste water, transportation (roads, airports, ports, and rail), telecommunications, education, health, and municipal services

 

site-visit-nyseSustainable economic growth is predicated on an effective enabling environment, sound rule of law practices, and businesses that can compete in the local, regional, and international markets.  An effective enabling environment consists of “balanced” pro-private sector policies with appropriate regulation that fosters a competitive playing field.  Effective rule-of-law processes ensure the enforceability of contracts and maintenance of property rights. Business competitiveness is simply the minimum price necessary to enter the marketplace.


Good governance structures is inextricably linked to sustainable economic growth. Governance, which can take on many forms and institutional arrangements depending on cultural and historical factors, is by necessity, a broad concept. Good governance is then the capacity to manage through the commitment to results and the rule of law with fiscal prudence and a high degree of transparency and accountability.


To address the number of issues that go into sustainable economic growth and good governance, IP3 provides a suite of classroom and online courses.

 Key training areas include:
  • Strengthening policy, legal and institutional frameworks to support economic growth
  • Removing legal and bureaucratic constraints to private business and entrepreneurs
  • Identifying managerial tools to instill an entrepreneurial mindset to service delivery
  • Developing investment and financing mechanisms to support small and medium enterprise (SME) development
  • Fostering accountability and transparency in governance
  • Improving the responsiveness of governments to their citizens with stakeholder involvement
  • Establishing policies and procedures to combat public and private corruption
  • Designing and implementing “e-government” and other technology driven solutions

 

project-finance-imgProject finance is often defined as the long- term financing of infrastructure projects based upon the projected cash flows of the project rather than the balance sheets of the project sponsors. Virtually all privately financed infrastructure projects utilize some form of project financing to secure the transaction.

Understanding the strategic and technical components of Project Finance is absolutely critical for individuals involved with planning and financing infrastructure development.

Strategic elements of project financing include an understanding of project screening, value-for-money analysis, and risk mitigation & allocation.  Technical elements of project financing include an understanding of the data and relevant assumptions, sensitivity analyses, tariffs, projecting cash flow, NPV & IRR returns, and cost of capital – all critical to building and interpreting the actual financial model.

To address the range of issues involved in project finance, IP3 provides a suite of classroom and online courses as well as a professional Project Finance certification program.

 Key training areas include:
  • Developing effective screening processes and feasibility studies that are based on financial data and  assumptions
  • Identifying and allocating various risks associated with each project to the various stakeholders
  • Constructing  financial models of a project finance transaction, calculate value for money (VfM) and public sector comparator (PSC) benchmarks, evaluate feasibility assumptions and NPV values for the underlying investment
  • Preparing sensitivity analysis’s to stress test the project’s cash flows, projected internal rate of return (IRR), debt service coverage ratios(DSCR)
  • Identifying and developing sources of financing through infrastructure development funds
  • Assessing  underlying assumptions economic and financial assumptions contained in the financial models developed by private companies and their advisors.
  • Presenting and discussing findings to various strategic and technical stakeholders

 

Sectors include: energy & electricity, water & waste water, transportation (roads/bridges, airports, ports, and rail), telecommunications, education, health, and municipal services